Monday, February 02, 2009

Obama Regime Asserts CIA's Continued Use of Renditions

This is not surprising, and i almost didn't post it as it's just the same old same old.

So why did i? Well, because too many of us are hoping against our better judgment that the hype might be true. Which would be a deadly temptation to give into.

So the Obama regime is planning to keep renditions in play, which essentially allows them a way to get around all the human rights reforms they're fussing over. Not that these reforms would be rendered ineffectual, but rather that they might work to reign in the culture of open brutality that has spread through the u.s., replacing it with the more sustainable culture of deniable brutality.

Under this new regime, the outsourcing of torture - as happened to Maher Arar and countless others - will continue without a hitch.

Hopefully the confused liberal momentum behind Obama will push the administration to back down from this. But i wouldn't hold my breath.

From the Austin American Statesman:

Obama to let CIA use controversial renditions
Terror suspects can still be secretly seized and sent to other countries.
Sunday, February 01, 2009

WASHINGTON — The CIA's secret prisons and Guantánamo Bay detention center are being shuttered. Harsh interrogation techniques are off-limits.

But, under executive orders issued by President Barack Obama last week, the CIA still has authority to carry out "renditions," the secret abductions and transfers of prisoners to countries that cooperate with the U.S.

Current and former U.S. intelligence officials said that the rendition program may be poised to play an expanded role going forward because it is the main remaining mechanism — aside from Predator missile strikes — for taking suspected terrorists off the street.

"Obviously you need to preserve some tools. You still have to go after the bad guys," said an Obama administration official, speaking on condition of anonymity when discussing the legal reasoning. "The legal advisers working on this looked at rendition. It is controversial in some circles. … But if done within certain parameters, it is an acceptable practice."

The decision to preserve the program didn't draw major protests, even among some human rights groups.

"Under limited circumstances, there is a legitimate place" for renditions, said Tom Malinowski, the Washington advocacy director for Human Rights Watch.

But Malinowski said he has urged the Obama administration to require that prisoners be transferred to other countries only when there is a guarantee they will get a public hearing in an official court. "Producing a prisoner before a real court is a key safeguard against torture, abuse and disappearance," Malinowski said.


  1. Glad you pointed this out - i must say that the proof will be in the pudding, so to speak.

    In regards to the so-called "black sites", i fail to see this as an incredible improvement (i.e. the fact that people can only be held in these places temporarily). In regards to rendition, we will see if all that happens is the kind of extradition states regularly engage in, or more.

    But - seriously - thanks for pointing this distinction out.